Biden’s Student Loan Plan Isn’t in the Clear – Conservative Groups Are Quietly Planning to Block It in Court
By Ben Dutka|August 29, 2022
Biden’s Student Loan Plan Isn’t in the Clear – Conservative Groups Are Quietly Planning to Block It in Court

For the past few weeks, it has been the talk of the town: President Joe Biden’s student loan debt relief plan. It has generated a firestorm of criticism from Republicans and Conservatives across the nation.

Most Democrats support the plan, of course, and some even wanted to forgive more debt (up to $50,000). In the end, Biden’s intent to relieve as much as $20,000 still seems over the line to many taxpayers.

And the President’s proposal suddenly might face a big hurdle — even if it’s staying under wraps for the time being.

Biden’s plan, which he announced last week, allows borrowers who earn less than $125k/year individually or $250k/year in household income, to have $10k in student loans erased.

If they got a Pell Grant, the government would relieve up to $20,000. Economists and other critics say it will only increase inflation more, and is also an egregious abuse of executive authority.

These critics aren’t merely complaining vocally, either: it appears many are mobilizing to stop the plan from going through.

Multiple conservative groups are exploring strategic ways to block the proposal in court:

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R) told the Washington Examiner on Friday evening that his office is ‘actively looking into legal options to halt the Biden administration’s abuse of power and assault on working-class Americans.’

And among the conservative organizations eager to go to court is the powerful low-tax advocacy group Americans for Tax Reform, which is in the early process of staging a legal battle against the administration.

Tax Reform founder Grover Norquist said they’re seeking a partner with legal think tanks, so they can argue that Biden’s plan has “no constitutional justification.”

Norquist added that Congress members could sue the administration, because this move could be viewed as an affront to their power to pass laws. This complaint could gain traction among D.C. politicos, certainly.

Norquist said Biden didn’t go through Congress because he believes the President wouldn’t have received enough support from Democrats.

There is legal precedent for this pushback, too, as Norquist cites the Supreme Court’s West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency ruling in June, which made it tougher for the EPA and other agencies to “apply expansive interpretations” of federal law.

Then there’s the difficult question of, “Who is our Jane Roe?” Said Norquist:

A single taxpayer? A collection of students who never went to college — is that your best client — asking, why am I going to be paying for this?

He finished by saying that if a President can make this happen once, “he can do twice this later.” So “it’s not water under the bridge” once the plan is passed and complete.

In addition to efforts by Americans for Tax Reform, the conservative Job Creators Network is also thinking about litigation against the Biden administration.

CEO Alfredo Ortiz said they’ve “already got a handful of plaintiffs that would qualify for and pass the standing test,” and he referenced three Supreme Court rulings that overturned federal agency policy under the Biden administration.

These are just a few known examples of critics pushing back against Biden’s plan, and it’s likely that some of them will take steps forward.

That’s why it may not be so easy for the President to get his controversial idea through, which comes as hopeful news to many Americans angered by the proposal.

Key Takeaways:

  • Various Conservative groups and Attorneys General are considering legal ways to stop President Joe Biden’s student loan relief plan.
  • Americans for Tax Reform and Job Creators Network are lining up their cases right now.
  • Critics for the plan are taking action around the country, which means Biden’s proposal might not be so easily passed.

Source: Washington Examiner

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Ben Dutka
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
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